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just did a dvd called rediscovering god in america which includes a section on washington. and i'm very intrigued with the extraordinary job that mount vernon has done in blding a remarkable education center, which i encourage everyone who comes to washington to go see. i would be very tempted someday to write aovel aut washington personally. i think washington's life is so amazing. he is such a personal odyssey in the development of freedom and he's so little understood, but it would be very daunting because washington is maybe the most complex american. i'd be pretty intimidated right now to try to explain his mind and explain how he operated. >> host: we have about 5 minutes left in our first hour of three with author, writer newt gingrich and also former speaker of the house and historian. we're spending three hours talking about his 14 books over his ceer so far. the next telephone call is from jacksonville, florida. you're on the air. >> caller: hello and thank you r c-span and congratulations to brian lamb on his presidential medal of freedom. mr. gingrich, you spoke earlier abou
as they battle straight into the heart of america. >> 1500 died, only 30 were classified as innocent civilians and there were about 50 police officers that died. >> it's a classic turf war between different cartels. >> they spent 23 years fighting for the drug enforcement administration. recently retired he was in charge of global operations for the dea's 5300 special agents. >> along the southwest border is some of the most lucrative turf in the world. location, location, location. >> ten billion dollars in bulk cash grows the u.s.-mexico border on a given day related to drug trafficking. >> ten billion narco trafficking dollars is on par with the tourism industry which generated about $13 billion for mexico. during his presidential campaign felipe calderon vowed to crack down on the cartels. >> the army came in with about 2,000 troops. felipe calderon sent 5,000 additional army troops that will join the police department. >> 45,000 soldiers have been deployed all across mexico, a quarter of the army is now committed to fighting narco terror. >> since december 2006, he has waged a miserable b
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
and family of the ladies auxiliary. america honors your service as well. also, governor jan brewer is here of arizona. and mayor phil gordon, our host, here in phoenix. i want too acknowledge president dr. joe shirley jr., president of the navajo nation. and this wasn't on my original card, but this is just an extraordinary story and you may have already heard from her, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank mrs. helen denton, the secretary to dwight eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today and what an extraordinary story that is. so -- [ applause ] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before you as commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. we're joined by some of those who make it the finest force in the world. from luke air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. whether you wear the uniform today or wore it decades ago, you remind us of a fundamental truth. it's not the powerful weapons that make our military the strongest in the world, it's not the sophisticated system that
of america. >> 1500 died, only 30 were classified as innocent civilians and there were about 50 police officers that died. >> it's a classic turf war between different cartels. >> they spent 23 years fighting for the drug enforcement administration. recently retired he was in charge of global operations for the dea's 5300 special agents. >> along the southwest border is some of the most lucrative turf in the world. location, location, location. >> ten billion dollars in bulk cash grows the u.s.-mexico border on a given day related to drug trafficking. >> ten billion narco trafficking dollars is on par with the tourism industry which generated about $13 billion for mexico. during his presidential campaign felipe calderon vowed to crack down on the cartels. >> the army came in with about 2,000 troops. felipe calderon sent 5,000 additional army troops that will join the police department. >> 45,000 soldiers have been deployed all across mexico, a quarter of the army is now committed to fighting narco terror. >> since december 2006, he has waged a miserable battle against the narco kings m
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
america who have been inspired by her exceptional life story. we celebrate the greatness of the country in which such a story is possible. and we celebrate how with their overwhelming vote to confirm justice sotomayor the united states senate, republicans and democrats, tore down yet one more barrier to affirm our belief that in america the doors of opportunity must be open to all. and what that what, the senate look beyond the old division and they embraced excellence. they recognized justice sotomayor's intellect, ability, and presence of mind. a response -- her responsibility to each role in government. her fidelity to the law in each case that she hears, and her dedication to protecting our core constitutional rights and liberties. justice william brennan said that in order to ensure all these rights for all sentence, we must be attentive to the concrete reality is at stake in the decision before then. they must understand the pulse of life beneath the official version of events. justice sotomayor understands those realities because she has witnessed them firsthand. as a prosecutor,
americans are figuring out that it is bad for america and bad for them, so i think we are seeing the pendulum swing back. he is changing the political climate back to republican. greta: so what is the strategy for the republican party as these town halls continue to unfold across the country during this recess? >> this is a groundswell of grass roots people who are ticked off, and that is why we have a democracy. it is not so much of a grand strategy as a and a weakening or a reawakening of the country. xd-- not as much of a grand strategy as a weakening or a we awakening -- or a reawakening of the country. free enterprise, personal responsibility, liberty, and the like, and he is headed in a different direction. greta: they have said this is a little bit like herding cats. as a practical matter, the president and speaker pelosi and the senate majority leader, and they do not even need republican votes to get this passed, so why do they not just go ahead, get there and democrats, and forget about republicans and pass it? then what? >> well, they have the votes to do that, but i t
. >> public money, and i'm sure. >> my taxes? >> america's cable companies greeted c-span as a public service, a private business initiative, no government mandate or money -- that was held c-span was created. >> congress has delayed action on health care until after the august recess. this morning, we talk about this on "washington journal." host: tell us about the progress that was made on monday and what the senate may or may not be doing. guest: the house energy and commerce committee was able to pass the house democrats' version of health reform bill. they have been having a bit of trouble all along the way with some of the more conservative democrats, but they were able to make some deals and the house should take it up when they return from recess. the senate finance committee is working on a bipartisan health care bill right now and they will be working on this all week. i do not expect to see a final bill from them this week. aba proposal or something like that, but nothing complete. they have sent us a deadline of the 15th. probably after the recess. host: what about the fact that t
the campaign is there is no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat. there is one america. tonight if what we are hearing is correct, if he says we are going to cling to the public plan no matter what, he is saying blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. that's why he is losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is something they would go ahead with or maybe trying to float this idea to put pressure on everyone to come to some sort of agreement? >> i think that has to be part of it. just today gibbs said they hadn't decided in they were going to stop negotiating with the republicans. kyl said he wasn't going to whip up votes and grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. all the signals were there and they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support of the american people drop to 29%? this is something they are putting out there as a threat they could pull back. it is a
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
%, but this not our lives, this is our hobby. >> pageant owner annette hill believes america's backlash against pageants all began with the precocious images of jonbenet ramsey parading across the stage in 1996. ♪ ♪ >> next on "larry king live" -- >> she says the media tends to focus on the negative. >> do you want to go into child protective services? >> as do movies like "little miss sunshine". ♪ >> some people in america are disgusted by these pageants. >> we well, i think that's their opinion. we're not going to stop doing them. parents enjoy showcasing their kids. what is wrong with that? as long as you keep it in a positive aspect, i don't think anything is wrong with that. >> the spray tans, whis it so necessary? why can't children be beautiful the way they are? >> the tan, i mean, i just think it looks pretty to be tanned. you know? swimsuit models, whatever. you want to have a nice glow to you. >> but she's 4. >> but she's 4. >> look in the bathroom -- >> as for the over the top costumes? many people are concerned they're sexualizing these very young girls. do you think the show
specific ideas. sean: we will all just have to wait and see. america. >>> live and at large and laughing through our tears and our peers. >> these are troubled times. we need to hear them. some one unincumbered by politics as usual. someone who could kill a moose with one hand and skin a bear with the other. someone without a job. >> sarah palin weighing in on the healthcare reform conversation. >> yes! like a ship slowly appears over the horizon to an island of castaways. sarah palin has arrived with fresh new clothing and that little box she keeps next to her bed filled with crazy. >> the america i know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with down syndrome would have to stand in front of obama death panel so the bureaucrats can decide if it's worthy of healthcare. a system is downright evil. >> geraldo: you're speaking out to the plan to kill the baby. >> geraldo: the late night comics are having a ball with the healthcare debate. which is driven some say by my colleagues in cable news. >> wanted to get up right now and go to the window. open it and stick y
with crazy. >> the america i know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with down syndrome would have to stand in front of obama death panel so the bureaucrats can decide if it's worthy of healthcare. a system is downright evil. >> geraldo: you're speaking out to the plan to kill the baby. >> geraldo: the late night comics are having a ball with the healthcare debate. which is driven some say by my colleagues in cable news. >> wanted to get up right now and go to the window. open it and stick your head out and yell, "i'm as mad as hell and i'm not going to take this anymore!" >> my name is randy from montana. that i believe our constitution and it's a very important thing. i also get my news from the cable networks, because i don't like the spin that comes from the other places. >> you have to be careful about the cable networks, though. okay. go ahead. go on with the question. >> geraldo: as people vent, washington squirms, and town hall meetings erupt in impassioned debate. this is a fox news alert. >> the notion that somehow i ran for public office or member of congress are in
celebrities as he could to walk in the parades and attract recruit. the best known black man in america was jack johnson. he asked to join the service but he was an exile in paris and they wouldn't waive -- they did name a show after him. jack johnson was the biggest show the u.s. had. this is james reese, one of the best known men in harlem. the ahead of the music union. they wanted to hire musicians for society ball, they called him. some nights he would drive around harlem directing bands five or six different places. he would recruit from the streets of harlem. also the conductor of choice for a dance duo, vernon and irene castle. vernon castle was british citizen. and james muir traveled with them and got famous because of them. vernon castle joined the raf. they served in the 7th and 131st and the recruiting office was around the corner the cigar store. this is the tree of hope people touched for good luck, and they marched around with broomsticks on their shoulders instead of rifles. hayward used his wealthy friends to buy uniforms. they were porters and elevator operators and ar
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
. this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday of october on c- span. >> president obama goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed
as much to me as the chance toward america's highest civilian medal to these recipients here today. this is a chance for me and for the united states of america to say thank-you to some of the finest citizens of this country and all countries. the men and women honored today have led very different lives, receiving many different degrees. they are pioneers in science and medicine. they have made their mark in the courtroom, the community, and in congress. what unites them is a belief that most, forgive me for those who are not americans, but for what we believe to be those most american of the leaves. that our lives are what we make of them. no barriers of race, gender, or physical infirmity constrain the spirit. -- can constrain the spirit. the recipients of the medal of freedom did not set out to win this, or any other award. they did not set out in pursuit of glory or fame or riches, they set out guided by passion and hard work, aided by persistence, often with few advantages but the gifts, grace, and a good name given to them by god. let them stand as an example here in the uni
that it did to america's image in the world is something we're still on the way to repairing. >> although snort mccain opposes so-called enhanced interrogations, he says opening this investigation is a serious mistake because it could harm the cia's morale and effectiveness. democratic senator diane feinstein says she's horrified what she's read about the interrogation, she thinks the attorney general should have let the senate intelligence committee should have continued its own review before taking any acti action. >> thank you. brand new details tonight on two stunning crimes. in georgia, seven people found dead inside their home. cops have made an arrest, but the case is far from closed. and virginia tech students grieving as cops investigate the deaths of two teenagers. those stories after the break. if you're taking 8 extra-strength tylenol... a day on the days that you have arthritis pain, you could end up taking 4 times the number... of pills compared to aleve. choose aleve and you could start taking fewer pills. just 2 aleve have the strength... to relieve arthritis pain all day.
, and i hope you enjoy it. our members make up the most active and powerful union in america. today, we are in the battle of our lives as we push congress to enact real health care reform. we are using our union's power to counter some of the union lines that are spreading from coast-to-coast. we have spent roughly $1 million in the past month alone countering those lovely friends of america, the insurance companies. we are prepared to spend that much more in the months ahead. ouróy nurses are on tv with a powerful ad advocating for real health care reform. we have put organizers and staff into key congressional districts. we will not back down from this fight. america's working families are depending on us. this month, we are joining progressives in taking our message directly to members of congress with a nationwide highway to health care campaign, a rock-and-roll theme that is crisscrossing the country. nobody had better get in our way. stop by our booth and vigorous schedule. better yet, when the rv hitch your city, on board and blog about the energy you are seeing for healthcare r
of the book "the battle for america" join us later. >>> also, sonia sotomayor was confirmed late today by a vote of 68-31. nine republicans voted for her, and every democrat present. could that cause trouble for the republicans with latino votes next november? we'll look at that in "the politics fix." >>> and what american political celebrity was offered 40 cows and 20 goats for some guy to marry their daughter? and who said it was up to the daughter to decide? that's in tonight's "hardball sideshow." >>> we begin with the president's slipping approval ratings. now down to 50% in a new poll. patrick buchanan is an msnbc political analyst and bob shrum is a democratic analyst. let's take a look. here the quinnipiac poll numbers to look at. approve the president's performance, 50%. disapprove, 42%. that compares to only a month ago and just a month ago to 57% positive, 33% negative. now, let's look at the source of this. the quinn pi yak poll asks people how is the president handling the health care issue. there you have it, 39%. very, very low for an issue he really campaigned on. 52% o
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
, but not this time. >>> and he's america's money man. and president obama wants to keep him on the job. mr. obama revealed this morning that he'll nominate federal reserve chair, ben bernanke, nor for a second term, that announcement from martha's vineyard, where the family is vacations came through. he said bernanke has led the u.s. through the worst economic crisis that we've ever faced. he'll have to be confirmed by senate where some lawmakers might not be too happy with his first term. >>> promising news on the housing front, and it's about time. a closely watched index shows home prices have posted their first quarterly increase in 3 years. it was nearly a 3% jump from the first quarter but still down 15% from the second quarter of last year. home prices are now at home levels not seen since early 2003. >>> there's a lot of optimism about the economy in asia, but how about new york? cnn's richard quest joins us once again, but this time not from the front of the new york stock exchange, he's in brooklyn. what have you found there besides the waterfront, my friend? >> reporter: i've joined th
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
health and it is bad for the economic health of america. my husband had alzheimer's disease for 10 years, and sadly he died last year. but i had the freedom to talk to his doctor and participate in his treatment. i would lose that freedom under this bill. some panel of bureaucrats would decide what his treatment would be, and whether or not it would be cost-effective. i agree that our american health care needs reform, but we can do lots of things to improve our present health care. i don't think we need to throw out our present health care and have a whole new government system. i am totally against the government taking it over. [applause] i wanted president obama to succeed, but i am not terrified at the way -- at the direction at this country under president obama, harry reid, and nancy pelosi. they have spent billions of dollars in the last few months, and we're trillions of dollars in debt. congressman connolly, you are our representative. you represent we the people. i implore you to vote no on this bill, preserve our freedom, and prevent our country from sliding into economic rui
care in america. the previous caller hit the nail on the head when he said that wall street has taken over our health care, taking away from the people and giving it to the dollar profits. now we have a mess. and thank you, sis and. guest: as -- thank you, c-span. guest: it has not been in a huge issue for health reform so far, it has ballooned in the background. i think that it is something that could crop up, especially when the finance bill comes out. host: ted, calling on the democratic line from clinton, maryland. caller: good morning? can you hear me? host: yes, weekend. -- we can. caller: un this lady keep repeating the fact that the government -- you and this lady keep repeating the fact that the government ran out of money for cash for clunkers, but that does not mean that it was not successful. the larger issue is that the american people are being used and misused by the press and public authority. we have a health care bill in this country of $10.50 trillion per year. 30% goes to the insurance companies. that is $770 billion. that money could be used to help the president
of dollars. enough to open a dunkin' donuts in space. from america's most dependable 3g network. bringing you the first and only wireless 4g network. get the palm pre. only from sprint. only on the now network. deaf, hard of hearing and people with speech disabilities access www.sprintrelay.com. >>> the awful truth is told. many of those opposing health care reform actually want to destroy medicare. arianna huffington picks up where rachel maddow left off yesterday. and there may be only 41 maybe 43 votes for the public option in the senate but between 57 and a hundred democrats might abandon the bill in the house if there's no public option. we'll run the numbers past howard dean. the number for glenn beck meantime, 20, 20 advertisers now including walmart that now ditched him after he called the president a racist. worst persons ahead on kount. for your retirement makes sense, just stay on track. .dance you get from fidelity. thanks. stay on the line! whatever your destination, fidelity has the people, guidance, and investments to help you find your way. >>> rachel maddow violated the taboo
back at her fashion for good taste on "good morning america." >> from the vault, sushi in 1985 and a tasteful way to prepare sweet peas in 1982. >> when i was living in paris and learning cooking, my old freven chef taught me how to make big old store bought peas and they can be delicious. you start out with half a teaspoon of salt, about three cups of peas and then some lettuce leaves. those are shredded lettuce leaves. then two, three tablespoons of minced shall ots or scallions and about two tablespoons of bulleter. and a little bit of sugar. the reason for that is when you got old peas, you need a little sugar to give them that fresh taste because the sugar in old peas turns to stach. you want to make them taste sweet. >> now, this is the big prick of all. tack your hands and press the ingredients into the piece to brood them because that makes the flavor penetrate and then on to the stove and then put in just enough water to cover the peas and then put them over high heat with the cover on them, let them really boil hard. that's going to steam boil. it will take about 15 m
. >> yes and no and that everything that works well in america, the best stuff we get from capitalism. free markets. you talk about the boss and the people pleasing the boss, and you view it in politics from being a politician. i do it as a consumer reporter from businesses trying to please their customers. that's the ultimate accountability. we can only elect you once every four years. we can change the company we buy things from every two seconds. it's that motivation that makes things better. and i'm sorry i forgot the question what was going with that. but if we apply more about healthcare, we would see it in the few areas of healthcare for people pay for things himself. plastic surgery, basic eye surgery. races are coming down, quality are going up and the doctor gives out his e-mail address and cell phone number because he's looking to please the customer. it's good. >> mike: one of the things that gets talked about a lot in the insurance debate is really why does the individual have the policy owned by the employer rather than by the employee? >> at the left over from world war ii an
demand from america's consumers. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning. and thanks for being with us.we violent weather, which has ravished parts of eastern texas. >> it started yesterday afternoon, in the houston area, with heavy rain, strong wind and at least one tornado. >> meanwhile, a construction worker died after rainwater flooded the tunnel he was working in. >> water came in from everywhere. they were saying. and didn't know where it was coming from. had to go in there while they were on air, breathing air. we had to have hoses in there. we didn't know what the atmosphere was. >> two men were able to escape. but a body of a third worker was found about 50 feet inside the tunnel. >>> in nearby beaumont, texas, a tornado struck without warning in a crowded shopping center, sending people running for their lives. the twister touched down outside the kohl's department store, around 2:00 tuesday afternoon, catching shoppers offguard. a worker at a nearby restaurant grabbed his cell phone, capturing this video of the twister's powerful winds. >> it went over towards walmar
. uncompensated care in america cost $43 billion. you and i pay that tax. now, -- i want to address the 47 million who do not have health care coverage, to bring them into the system and that can help lower cost by having a bigger risk pools. the second thing i want to do is having meaningful cost of health care reform. let's start with medicare. i want to close the doughnut hole on prescription drugs. i want to make sure all of our seniors have access to the medications they need and that no one in america over 55 or 65 casta make this terrible decision, to lead by a meal or the prescription drugs that i need? yew instead both the there are some specialized prescription drugs that cost a lot of money. i want to make sure a catastrophic illness does not bankrupt families in america. in our district alone, the 11th congressional district, last year, 1430 families filed for bankruptcy because of health care costs. any family in america, young or old, could be one accident or one illness away from catastrophic health care costs. capping health-care -- catastrophic costs so that the family is forced i
or every industry across the country. the government has to be in there to keep corporate america honest? the steel industry, for example? you pick one and name one. the american people are saying we want health care reform. the republicans are saying we want health care reform, but we don't want a government takeover. we don't want socialized medicine and national health care. >> those words are frightening to a lot of people. let me ask you this about a moderate forum, what congressman cooper just mentioned. what do you think of a co-op? >> well, chris, i'm not sure we know what that co-op is. kent conrad has talked about it. all the machinations going on in the senate finance committee, it's all been kept close to the vest. i don't think the american people really know what this co-op would look like. i want to look at it closely. and certainly i will take -- just like senator shelby said on sunday, let's take a look at it and let's make sure. i think anything is better than this government option that's in there competing with an unfair advantage on an unequal playing field. >> let m
children's children what it once was like in america when men were free. >> holy sacagawea. freedom died in 1951? arianna, thanks for your time. >> thank you, keith. >> let me ask you mr. reagan's question from the black and white videotape and records days. do you remember what it was once like in america when men were free before medicare? >> well, actually, i don't have to have such a good memory because all you have to do is look at what's happening in america now to people under 65 who don't have health insurance or even have health insurance but can't pay the deduct ibls. we saw what happened last week, keith. right here outside los angeles in inglewood when people had to line up overnight to receive the kind of care that is normally provided by doctors and nurses in third world countries and they lined up and waited for eight days. by the end of the eight days there still weren't enough doctors and nurses to see them. that is what it looked like when men were free. >> connect the dots between that mr. reagan of 1961 and the medicare tyranny of mr. armey of 2009 if you'd be so kind
. >>> congress heads home to face america divided over health care changes. to discuss the policy and political divides with two key senators. john cornyn of texas, dick durbin of illinois. >>> and the big gap between the president's approval rating and his handling of the big issues. we take america's pulse with two top polls. >>> and the recession puts a squeeze on many community support organizations just when struggling parents and hungry children need the help most. the state of the union report for sunday, august 9th. >>> president obama heads to mexico tonight for a summit with the leaders of mexico and canada, a reminder of the mounting international pressures even as he struggles to sell his top domestic priority health care here at home. >>> greater cooperation fighting mexico's deadly drug world. and elsewhere on the stage, afghanistan, iran, and north korea all present the white house with difficult policy choices. the full and often frustrating list for the president and for his ambassador to the united nations susan rice. welcome. >> good to be with you. >> let's start with iran,
to add to make it workable for america's businesses and taxpayers for more than just one year. i think there's a lot more work that has to be done to get this right. having said that, we have to do something. we know the current system, the status quo is unacceptable for businesses and for people that pay for insurance. dave: the president has stated that there's some type of right-wing conspiracy, that that's the trouble in passing this health care legislation ex-said that on this radio show last week so what do you make of that assumption that there's a right-wing conspiracy when he has trouble with people in his own party like yourself? >> well, i don't think, first of all, that president obama has trouble with democrats or republicans. think we have to get a system that's workable, affordable for businesses, for individuals that pay a lot of money for health insurance for their families, and for taxpayers that collect -- picking up a very big tab for medicare and medicaid. think there are people on the left and right that have their very strong, philosophical views, of what needs
of clean energy. the department of the interior manages 20% of america. these lands that only include some of our treasured landscapes, but also some of the most productive energy areas. until recently, energy production of focus has been on conventional resources including oil, gas, and coal. insuring these resources is essential to our energy security, but we also have undeveloped potential on our public lands and under the leadership of president obama and secretary salazar, we are pursuing these opportunities. the bureau of land management has identified over 20 million acres of public land with energy potential and over 29 million acres with solar energy potential. there are also 140 million acres of public land in alaska with a geothermal resource potential as well as significant biomass potential. these public lands have the potential to produce a total of 2.9 megawatts of solar. 206 megawatts of wind. 39,000 megawatts of geothermal energy. there is also significant potential in our offshore waters. the department of energy, the national laboratory has identified more than 1000 giga
. the united states, saying we are responsibility for some of the violence because of america's hunger for drugs and the guns crossing from the united states to mexico. the mexican officials want to actually see some more aid, some money here. it was more than $1 billion that former president bush dedicated to fighting the drug effort. $100 million has been delayed in fighting that effort because some members of congress say there are human rights violations that are taking place inside mexico from its own military. they don't want the funds to flow to mexico until that is resolved. third, it's the economy. they will take a look at what is happening, what is the state of the u.s. economy and the recession because it has such a tremendous impact on the mexican economy as well as the canadian one. don? >> suzanne malveaux traveling with the president throughout this trip and reporting for cnn. >>> the summit is taking place across a backdrop of rising violence. michael ware is in guadalajara and i asked him about that. >> reporter: if you look at the grand scheme of this drug war it is n
: president obama responded it is true. you cannot cover all the uninsured in america for three. he reiterated its promise to completely avoid raising taxes on those who earn less than 1/4 of a million dollars per year. the president has an answer. >> 2/3 of the money we can obtain just by eliminating waste and inefficiencies. the congressional budget office agreed with that, which is not something i am making up. republicans do not dispute it. the other 1/3 we would have to find additional revenue, but it would not come on the backs of the middle-class. shepard: the president said he appreciated the question and "the respectful way in which the man asked it." a nod to the reality that the meetings have become difficult at times. major garrett, there has been talk that things might get a little more rowdy. >> the audience here was first- come, first-served, unlike in new hampshire, which was by lottery. some people slept out overnight to make sure they got into the auditorium. the town is just outside of a big city in montana. the state has been trending democratic of late. the questions the p
africa and the operations of hezbollah. we had experts here in the audience dealing with latin america. the question is, what are the iranians doing? what is hezbollah doing in that area? and in connection with the iranian involvement, and we do have our record of almost 30 years, it seems to me that we have to ponder the future with great concern particularly when we see the continuity of the ahmadinejad regime in iran today. so again, the bottom line of the question of threats and response depends on the perception of the threat and the coming of around at that i think we have to develop in order to reduce the risk of terrorism. so unfortunately from the academic point of view and a practical point of view, we would have to deal with this issue in the coming months as well as the coming years. i like to thank this opportunity -- take this opportunity to thank our panelist for this discussion. at this point, i would also like to recognize the interns who have worked with us this summer, who are finishing the work tomorrow. would you all please rise? where are the interns? this is the
read it earlier. the america i know and love is not one in which my parents or baby with down syndrome will have to stand in front of obama's death penalty for she calls itself as bureaucrats can decide whether they are worthy of healthcare. such a system is downright evil. doesn't hurt republicans of her statements like that made by a former public and governor of alaska? the tensions entitled to say it anyway she wants to and that's what america is about is letting people speak their mind. i think the3ik.2u-'fkñ]suñb'!1 when i was told i had diabetes, i felt amazingly boxed in. (announcer) joe uses the contour meter from bayer. (joe) my meter absolutely adapts to me and my lifestyle. i'm joe james, and being outside of the box is my simple win. (announcer) now available in five vibrant colors. >> julie: from humble beginnings in a new york housing market to the united states supreme court, justice sonia sotomayor reaching the peak of her profession today as she was sworn in to sit on the nation's highest court. >> under the constitution and laws of united states. >> so help me god.
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